Programming for Faculty & Staff

Notice & Respond: Assisting Students in Distress

This interactive bystander education program teaches staff and faculty:

  • what to look for that might indicate that a student is struggling emotionally
  • how to effectively talk about it
  • how to gauge the severity of the situation 
  • where to find assistance and support for various situations 

Using a realistic filmed scenario, facilitated discussion, and a review of campus resources, participants are given tools and information to help them successfully navigate mental health situations they may find themselves in as members of our campus community. Participants also discuss common concerns that can make it difficult to reach out to others in distress, and how to overcome these potential barriers.

View the video trailer:

View with interactive transcript on CornellCast

Self-Care is Professional Development

This fun and engaging workshop encourages staff/faculty to practice self-care as a vital part of professional development. Stress is an inevitable part of life. The goal isn’t to get rid of stress, but rather to learn to respond to it well. This program provides information about self-care strategies and resources that can be utilized during the work day as well as outside of work. Staff/faculty will explore specific techniques to strengthen their own emotional resilience and keep their stress in check in order to thrive (and not just survive) at Cornell and beyond. Workshops can range in time from 60–90 minutes depending on the group’s needs. Contact ct265@cornell.edu to request this program. 

Programming opportunities

For faculty departments

Faculty departments are offered a 60-minute seminar that models an effective interaction between a faculty member and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a filmed realistic scenario at Cornell, participant discussion, and a review (Powerpoint slides, handouts) of response options and campus resources.

For Graduate Teaching Assistants

These individuals are offered a 90-minute seminar using the same format described above to increase awareness and build confidence in recognizing and responding to students in distress.

For staff groups

Staff are offered this 2-hour session that models an effective interaction between a staff member and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important.A combination of learning modalities is used, including a filmed realistic scenario at Cornell, participant discussion, and a review (Powerpoint slides, handouts) of response options and campus resources.

Requesting a program

To request a program – or to learn more about "Assisting Students in Distress" – please contact Catherine Thrasher-Carroll, Mental Health Promotion Coordinator, at 607-255-4782 or ct265@cornell.edu.