Programming for Students

The programming options below were developed by staff members in Cornell Health's Skorton Center for Health Initiatives.  

Requesting a program

To request a program or training from the Skorton Center, please complete this form.

Please note:

  • In-person programs are available to groups of 30 individuals or more
  • Online and pre-recorded materials are available for anyone (Cornell NetID required for Canvas courses)

Program descriptions (2022-2023)

Cornell Health overview videos 

We offer two videos designed for undergraduate, graduate, and professional students in Ithaca: 

Both videos provide information about the medical, mental health, and support services available to students at Cornell Health. They also highlight when and how to access services, cost for care and using insurance, along with 24/7 resources.

Bystander intervention programming

Intervene

"Intervene" is both a video and a workshop:

  • Video: The online 20-minute video Intervene includes brief filmed scenarios demonstrating ways in which student bystanders can successfully intervene in problematic situations. Seven different situations are addressed, including sexual assault, sexual harassment, intimate partner violence (emotional abuse), hazing, alcohol emergency, emotional distress, and bias. Characters in the film represent the diverse identities of college student populations including race, nationality, religion, gender, sexual orientation, and ability. View the Intervene video.
  • Workshop: 60-minute in-person workshop provides an opportunity for students to view the video with others and engage in a facilitated conversation to reflect upon the attitudes and behaviors that influence the process of intervening as an individual or with assistance. Participants also discuss additional related scenarios not included in the film and resources available to support them and their peers.

> Learn more about Intervene

Notice and Respond: Friend 2 Friend

Available in the following ways:

These bystander intervention programs were developed specifically to help Cornell undergraduate, graduate, and professional students to recognize and respond to their peers (roommate or housemate, friend, classmate or lab-mate, other acquaintance) who may be experiencing distress. Through didactic material and situational examples these training courses will provide undergraduate, graduate and professional students with information about signs and levels of distress (concern, urgent, and emergency) they may notice in peers, as well as corresponding response options, including campus, local and national resources.  

Additionally, students will learn when and how to ask about suicide and that asking directly about suicide does not increase the risk that the person will act on these thoughts. This course covers the importance of encouraging help-seeking and utilization of resources with peers.

Resilience-based programming

Thrive (don’t just survive) @ Cornell

Available in the following ways:

These resilience-based, stress-management courses were developed specifically for Cornell undergraduate, graduate and professional students. The program is designed to provide students with a variety of tools, strategies and resources to help them develop habits to support their mental health and well-being in order to successfully navigate their time at Cornell.

These courses emphasize the significance of recognizing that stress is a part of life, not all stress is bad, and that the goal is to learn to manage stress well by using the practices and strategies summarized in the program’s Resilience Pyramid. The trainings present didactic material through PowerPoint slides and short videos to illustrate the importance of self-care and daily health practices, opportunities to make meaningful social connections, and self-reflection techniques to promote a growth mindset style of thinking, meaning-making, and finding purpose. The in-person program also includes experiential activities to illustrate the resilience concepts.

Other programming

Alcohol and Other Drug Education

Available in the following ways:

Most Cornell students either do not drink alcohol or do so in moderation. And most do not use cannabis/marijuana or other drugs. But some students do use drugs or drink alcohol in problematic ways, which causes harm to themselves and/or those around them. This online training is designed to provide Cornell students with information to make informed decisions related to alcohol and other drugs. Whether or not you ever drink alcohol or use drugs, this information is important. This program will help you understand how to reduce risks to yourself and others that can result from alcohol and other drug use and how to recognize and respond to an alcohol or other drug emergency.

How to Recognize and Respond to Hazing

Available in the following ways:

This training discusses hazing, a form of interpersonal violence. This training explores what constitutes hazing and what you can do if you or someone you know is hazed. This training will walk through various forms hazing behavior takes, the emotional and physical impact of hazing on individuals and communities, how to recognize signs of hazing, and ways to support someone who has been hazed, including an overview of campus resources available to help.

Preventing Sexual Violence

Interactive discussions are tailored for groups requesting programs on sexual violence, dating violence, domestic violence, and/or stalking. Students are given tools and information to help them understand definitions, available resources, how to be an active bystander, and how to respond to a friend who has shared an experience of abuse or violence.

Contact lbw26@cornell.edu to request this program